The Real Estate Edge

The Real Estate Edge

Everything You Need to Know about Home Equity

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It is true that during the previous few years, unprecedented home price increase has resulted in large equity gains for homeowners. 

 

That’s excellent news for the value of your property during the past couple of years, but what if you’ve been there for longer? You could be unsure about your actual equity position. 

 

A research was conducted by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) to determine the normal equity increases across longer time periods. You could be inspired to move by the facts they gathered. Just keep in mind that you should obtain a professional equity evaluation from a reputable real estate expert to determine how much equity you have in your particular residence. 

 

Your Equity’s Growth 

 

Let’s begin by defining how equity in your house is created. While price growth is undoubtedly an aspect that might assist increase your equity, you also gradually increase equity as you pay down your mortgage. 

 

Over time, the average equity growth 

 

The usual equity gain over time is broken down in the NAR research. It computes the equity that a homeowner may have accrued had they remained the current owners of the median-priced property five, ten, or thirty years after purchasing it. 

 

These six-figure figures are remarkable and undoubtedly sufficient to motivate you to move into your subsequent residence, but they do not represent a guarantee. Keep in mind that your personal equity gain will vary. It depends on a variety of factors, including how long you’ve lived there, the state of your home, any modifications you’ve done, your neighborhood, and more. 

 

Work with a reputable real estate agent to get your home’s equity assessed if you want to know how much equity you have. They may offer a professional assessment on the current market value of your property and how the equity you’ve built up over time will benefit you when you buy your next house. You could only need a portion of it, if not all of it, for your subsequent down payment.

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